CURRENT MOON

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Blue Resonant Night/ Blue Spectral Eagle - Crystal Rabbit Moon of Cooperation, Day 2







Angel DeCora (Winnebago) developed the Native Arts and Crafts program at Carlisle in 1906.





Angel De Cora Dietz (1871–1919) was a Winnebago painter, illustrator, Native American rights advocate, and teacher at Carlisle Indian School. She was the best known Native American artist before World War I.

Angel De Cora Dietz or Hinook-Mahiwi-Kalinaka (Fleecy Cloud Floating in Place), was born at the Winnebago Agency in Dakota County (now Thurston), Nebraska, on May 3, the daughter of David Tall Decora, a Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) of French ancestry and a son of the Little Decorah, a hereditary chief. Angel was born into the Thunderbird clan; her English and Ho-Chunk names were chosen by a relative who was asked to name her, opened the Bible, and the word "angel" caught her eye. Her mother was a member of the influential LaMere family. She was kidnapped at a young age from the Agency, and sent to school in Hampton, Virginia. "A strange white man appeared on the reservation and asked her, through an interpreter, if she would like to ride on a steam car; with six other children, she decided to try it, and when the ride was ended she found herself in Hampton. '(It was) three years later when I returned to my mother' says Angel De Cora. 'she told me that for months she wept and mourned for me. My father and the old chief and his wife had died, and with them the old Indian life was gone.'"

As granddaughter to the chief of the Winnebago tribe, Hinook existed in a position of influence since “among most plains people, power and cultural knowledge were accumulated by and dispensed through females”. Although Hinook’s mother was French in origin, Hinook would be expected to follow in her grandmothers footsteps in passing along cultural traditions. “During the summers we lived on the Reservation, my mother cultivating her garden and my father playing the chief's son. During the winter we used to follow the chase away off the Reservation, along rivers and forests. My father provided not only for his family then, but his father's also. We were always moving camp. As a child, my life was ideal. In all my childhood I never received a cross word from any one, but nevertheless, my training was incessant. About as early as I can remember, I was lulled to sleep night after night by my father's or grandparent's recital of laws and customs that had regulated the daily life of my grand sires for generations and generations, and in the morning I was awakened by the same counselling. Under the influence of such precepts and customs, I acquired the general bearing of a well-counselled Indian child, rather reserved, respectful, and mild in manner.

Taken from her family and placed into the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, Hinook/de Cora was to accomplish the U.S. federal government’s vision of “educating Indian girls in the hope that women trained as good housewives would help their mates assimilate” into U.S. mainstream culture.  De Cora studied at a local preparatory school in Hampton, Virginia, working for a local family. Afterwards De Cora was educated at Burnham Classical School for Girls. She then studied art at Smith College. She studied specifically illustration at Drexel Institute (now Drexel University) and also studied at the Cowles Art School in Boston.

De Cora was married to William Henry “Lone Star” Dietz (Wicarhpi Isnala), who claimed Dakota and German descent but his true identity remains highly controversial. Dietz also taught at the Carlisle Indian School. He and De Cora met at the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904. In addition to his art, Dietz was a notable football player, and in 1915 he became head coach of Washington State; he later was the first head coach of the Washington Redskins.

Towards the end of her career, De Cora and her husband taught art at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. In her tonalist art work, Angel De Cora painted firelight to illuminate warm memories of her childhood life on the Nebraska plains after she settled far from home in the east”. Her oil Painting, "for an Indian school exhibit, for the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York" demonstrates the technical prowess and emotional depth of her art.

De Cora created the title-page designs for Natalie Curtis's The Indians' Book, a collection of Native American songs, stories, and artwork first published in 1907.

Unfortunately not much of De Cora's original paintings remain, but she illustrated her own stories published in Harper's Magazine and illustrated books. The 1911 Yellow Star: A Story of East West, by Elaine Goodale Eastman features illustrations by De Cora and her husband, William Henry Dietz. Her illustrations are rare for her time period because she portrayed Native Americans wearing contemporary clothing.

Angel De Cora contracted pneumonia, and she died in the Cooley Dickinson Hospital in Northampton, Massachusetts on 6 February 1919. She is buried at the Bridge Street Cemetery.*




AKBAL



Kin 163: Blue Resonant Night


I channel in order to dream
Inspiring intuition
I seal the input of abundance
With the resonant tone of attunement
I am guided by the power of vision.



According to the doctrine of correspondence every manifestation
or appearance is a sign that corresponds to another reality, a symbolic reality projected by the mind itself.*


*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2015-2016.






The Sacred Tzolk'in 





Muladhara Chakra  (Seli Plasma)





Monday, May 30, 2016

White Rhythmic Wind/ White Planetary Wizard - Crystal Rabbit Moon of Cooperation, Day 1









Chief Hollow Horn Bear At the world’s fair held in Omaha, Nebraska,
in 1898, by photographer, Frank Rinehart.



"Someday the Earth will weep.  She will beg for her life.  She will cry with tears of blood. You will make a choice, if you will help her or let her die, and when she dies, you, too, will die."

Chief Hollow Horn Bear, Brule Lakota



Hollow Horn Bear (Lakota name Matȟó Héȟloǧeča) (ca. 1850 – 1913) was a Brulé Lakota leader during the Indian Wars on the Great Plains of the United States.

Hollow Horn Bear was born in what today is Sheridan County, Nebraska. He was the son of chief Iron Shell. Although he initially raided the Pawnee, he later was involved in harassing forts along the Bozeman Trail with other Sioux leaders between 1866 and 1868. During this period, he became famous as the chief who defeated Capt. William Fetterman. However, he began to favor peace with the whites during the 1870's. He became a celebrity in the East, and was present at several functions as a native representative. He was featured on a 14-cent postage stamp and on a five dollar bill.

He was appointed the head of Indian police at the South Dakota Rosebud Agency, and arrested Crow Dog for the murder of Spotted Tail. He was also involved in treaty negotiations. In June 1895 he demanded the removal of J. George Wright, an unpopular Indian Agent, over the reduction of Indian rations and fright allowances. Hollow Horn Bear issued 21 days' notice to the Agent to abdicate and for the Whites to leave the Reservation. In September 1895 Agent Wright imprisoned Hollow Horn Bear in the agency's guardhouse but, subsequently, released him. In 1896 Wright was promoted to the position of Indian Inspector, with authority that extended over numerous Indian Reservations and agencies. In 1905, Hollow Horn Bear was invited to take part in the presidential inauguration of Theodore Roosevelt, and in 1913, he led a group of Indians to the inauguration parade of President Woodrow Wilson. He caught pneumonia during the visit and died.*

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollow_Horn_Bear





IK



Kin 162: White Rhythmic Wind


I organize in order to communicate
Balancing breath
I seal the input of spirit 
With the rhythmic tone of equality
I am guided by my own power doubled.



A crystal requires no maintenance to sustain its perfect form.  All of life requires maintenance which at minimum includes water, light and air.*



*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2015-2016.







The Sacred Tzolk'in





Sahasrara Chakra  (Dali Plasma)





Sunday, May 29, 2016

Red Overtone Dragon/ Red Solar Skywalker - Spectral Serpent Moon of Liberation, Day 28





Genesis, 1993, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith.  




Jaune Quick–to–See Smith (born 1940) is a Native American contemporary artist. Her work is held in the collections of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Born January 15, 1940 in St. Ignatius, a small town on the Flathead Reservation on the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Indian Reservation, Montana, Jaune Quick–to–See Smith is an internationally renowned painter, print maker and artist. Her first name comes from the French word for "yellow" (jaune), from her French-Cree ancestry. Her middle name "Quick-to-See" was given by her Shoshone grandmother as a sign of her ability to grasp things readily.

She earned a BA in Art Education from Framingham State College, Massachusetts, and an MA in Art from the University of New Mexico. Smith has been awarded four honorary doctorates from Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Pennsylvania Academy of the Arts, Massachusetts College of Art and the University of New Mexico. In 2015 she received an honorary degree in Native American Studies from Salish Kootanai College, Pablo, MT.

Smith has been creating complicated abstract paintings and lithographs since the 1970s. She employs a wide variety of media, working in painting, printmaking and richly textured mixed media pieces. Such images and collage elements as commercial slogans, sign-like petroglyphs, rough drawing, and the inclusion and layering of text are unusually intersected into a complex vision created out of the artist’s personal experience. Her works contain strong, insistent socio-political commentary that speaks to past and present cultural appropriation and abuse, while identifying the continued significance of the Native American peoples. She addresses today’s tribal politics, human rights and environmental issues with humor.

A guest lecturer at over 185 universities, museums and conferences around the world, Smith has also shown her work in over 100 solo exhibitions. Her work has been reviewed by The New York Times, Art News, Art In America, Art Forum, The New Art Examiner and many other notable publications. She also organizes and curates numerous Native American exhibitions and serves as an activist and spokesperson for contemporary Native art. She is included in many private and public international collections, including The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Mankind, Vienna, Austria; The Museum of Modern Art, Quito, Ecuador; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Smith’s work is included in many important museum collections: Museum of Modern Art, NY, NY; Whitney Museum of American Art, NY, NY; Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, NY; Brooklyn Museum, NY; Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Washington, DC; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Museum for World Cultures, Frankfurt, Germany and Museum for Ethnology, Berlin.

Among other honors, she has received the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters Grant, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Women's Caucus for the Arts, the College Art Association’s Committee on Women in the Arts Award, the 2005 New Mexico Governor’s Outstanding New Mexico Woman’s Award, and the 2005 New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts (Allan Houser Award). Smith also has been admitted to the New Mexico Women’s Hall of Fame.

Her collaborative public artworks include the terrazzo floor design in the Great Hall of the Denver Airport; an in-situ sculpture piece in Yerba Buena Gardens, San Francisco; and a mile-long sidewalk history trail in West Seattle,

Recent awards include a grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation to archive her work; the 2011 Art Table Artist Award; Moore College of Art & Design, PA, Visionary Woman Award for 2011; Induction into the National Academy of Art 2011; Living Artist of Distinction, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, NM, 2012; the Switzer Distinguished Artist Award for 2012, and the Woodson Foundation, Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014. Smith also holds honorary doctorates from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Arts, the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Massachusetts College of Art and Design and the University of New Mexico. In 2015 she received an honorary degree in Native American Studies from Salish Kootanai College, Pablo, MT.

Recent solo exhibitions include: 2015: "Art After the Drought" at the Museum of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, TX; 2014: "Water and War" at the The Bernstein Gallery in The Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University. "Artists and Arts Workers" in the Robert E. Elberson Fine Arts Center at Salem College, and an exhibit at the Maudeville Art Gallery at Union College in Schenectady, NY. 2013: "Water and War" at the Accola Griefen Gallery in New York City.




IMIX



Kin 161: Red Overtone Dragon


I empower in order to nurture
Commanding being
I seal the input of birth
With the overtone tone of radiance
I am guided by the power of universal water.



Through the Cube, imaginal and phenomenal planes of reality are joined into a unified whole.*



*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2015-2016.







The Sacred Tzolk'in 





Anahata Chakra (Silio Plasma)





Saturday, May 28, 2016

Yellow Self-Existing Sun/ Yellow Galactic Human - Spectral Serpent Moon of Liberation, Day 27







"Creative Hands", Pablita Velarde, 1976. 



Pablita Velarde (September 19, 1918 – January 12, 2006) born Tse Tsan (Tewa, "Golden Dawn") was an American painter.  Velarde was born on Santa Clara Pueblo near Española, New Mexico. After the death of her mother when Pablita was about five years old, she and two of her sisters were sent to St. Catherine's Indian School in Santa Fe. At the age of fourteen, she was accepted to Dorothy Dunn's Santa Fe Studio Art School at the Santa Fe Indian School. There, she become an accomplished painter in the Dunn style, known as "flat painting".

Her early paintings were exclusively watercolors, but later in life she learned how to prepare paints from natural pigments (a process similar to, but not the same as fresco secco). She used these paints to produce what she called "earth paintings". She obtained the pigments from minerals and rocks, which she ground on a metate and mano until the result was a powdery substance from which she made her paints.

In 1939, Velarde was commissioned by the National Park Service under a grant from the Works Progress Administration (WPA) to depict scenes of traditional Pueblo life for visitors to the Bandelier National Monument.

Following her work at Bandelier, Velarde went on to become one of the most accomplished Native American painters of her generation, with solo exhibitions throughout the United States, including her native New Mexico, as well as Florida and California. In 1953, she was the first woman to receive the Grand Purchase Award at the Philbrook Museum of Art’s Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Indian Painting. In 1954 the French government honored her with the Palmes Académiques for excellence in art.

In a 1979 interview she said, "Painting was not considered women's work in my time. A woman was supposed to be just a woman, like a housewife and a mother and chief cook. Those were things I wasn't interested in."

Velarde's work is exhibited in public and private collections including the Museum of New Mexico, the Bandelier National Monument museum, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, in Santa Fe, the Avery Collection at the Arizona State Museum, the Ruth and Charles Elkus Collection of Native American Art, and in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

In February 2007 a yearlong exhibition opened at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe, New Mexico memorializing Pablita Velarde and her time spent at Bandelier National Monument. A collection of 58 paintings from the 84 works that Monument officials commissioned Velarde to produce between 1939 and 1945 went on display. Pablita's grand daughter, Margarete Bagshaw owns a gallery in downtown Santa Fe that is named after Pablita's Tewa Name - "Golden Dawn". The gallery is the Exclusive Estate Representative of both Pablita Velarde and her daughter, Helen Hardin.


AHAU




Kin 160: Yellow Self-Existing Sun


I define in order to enlighten
Measuring life
I seal the matrix of universal fire
With the self-existing tone of form
I am guided by the power of intelligence
I am a polar kin
I convert the yellow galactic spectrum.



Through practice we come to realize that it is not only in doing, but in refraining from doing that we learn.*



*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2015-2016.








The Sacred Tzolk'in 






Manipura Chakra (Limi Plasma)





Friday, May 27, 2016

Blue Electric Storm/ Blue Resonant Monkey - Spectral Serpent Moon of Liberation, Day 26






"His Hair Flows Like a River". T.C. Cannon.




Tommy Wayne Cannon (September 27, 1946–May 8, 1978) was an important Native American artist of the 20th century. An enrolled member of the Kiowa Tribe with Caddo and French descent, he was popularly known as T.C. Cannon.

Cannon grew up in Zodaltone and Gracemont, Oklahoma. His parents were Walter Cannon (Kiowa) and Minnie Ahdunko Cannon (Caddo). His Kiowa name, Pai-doung-a-day, means "One Who Stands in the Sun." He was exposed to the art of the Kiowa Six, a group of Native American painters who achieved international reputations in the fine art world and who helped developed the Southern Plains-style of painting. Stephen Mopope and Lee Tsatoke Sr. were particularly influential on the young artist.

T.C. Cannon enrolled in the Institute of American Indian Arts of Santa Fe in 1964, where he studied under Fritz Scholder (Luiseño). After graduating from IAIA, he enrolled in the San Francisco Art Institute but left after two months and enlisted in the army. As paratrooper in the 101st Airborne Division, Cannon was sent to Vietnam from 1967 to 1968. During the Tet Offensive, he earned two Bronze Star Medals. He was also inducted into the Black Leggings Society, the traditional Kiowa warriors' society.

While still stationed in Vietnam, Cannon had a breakthrough in his art career. Rosemary Ellison, curator of the Southern Plains Indian Museum in Anadarko, Oklahoma, included him in a major traveling exhibit, Contemporary Southern Plains Indian Art.

In 1972, Cannon and fellow artist Fritz Scholder had a two-man exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution's National Collection of Fine Arts, titled Two American Painters. Cannon produced a large body of work over the next six years, in preparation for his first one-man show, scheduled to open at the Aberbach Gallery in New York in October 1978. On May 8 of that year, however, he died in an automobile accident. After a delay, the show opened on December 10, 1979, as T.C. Cannon: A Memorial Exhibition. Featuring 50 works by Cannon, the show traveled to such locations as the Heard Museum, the New Mexico Museum of Art, and the Buffalo Bill Historical Center.

Cannon was an artist-in-residence at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire; Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado; and the United States National Park Service. In 1988 he was inducted into the National Hall of Fame for Famous American Indians in Anadarko




CAUAC



Kin 159: Blue Electric Storm


I activate in order to catalyze
Bonding energy
I seal the matrix of self-generation
With the electric tone of service
I am guided by the power of abundance.



On Earth, the last planet analphs are stored in the archaic depths of mind as legends and myths, such as the Greek legend of Icarus, who flies too close to the sun and melts his artificial wings.*



*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Instiute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2015-2016.





The Sacred Tzolk'in 





Visshudha Chakra (Alpha Plasma)






Thursday, May 26, 2016

White Lunar Mirror/ White Rhythmic Dog - Spectral Serpent Moon of Liberation, Day 25


Image result for apache chief cochise
APACHE Chief Cochise after Civil War.





Cochise (/koʊˈtʃiːs/; Cheis or A-da-tli-chi, in Apache K'uu-ch'ish "oak"; c. 1805 – June 8, 1874) was leader of the Chihuicahui local group of the Chokonen ("central" or "real" Chiricahua) and principal chief (or nantan) of the Chokonen band of the Chiricahua Apache. He led an uprising against the American government that began in 1861. Cochise County, Arizona is named after him.

Cochise (or "Cheis") was one of the most noted Apache leaders (along with Geronimo and Mangas Coloradas) to resist intrusions by European Americans during the 19th century. He was described as a large man (for the time), with a muscular frame, classical features, and long black hair, which he wore in traditional Apache style. He was about 6' tall and weighed about 175 lbs. In his own language, his name Cheis meant "having the quality or strength of oak."

Cochise and the Chokonen-Chiricahua lived in the area that is now the northern region of Sonora, Mexico; New Mexico and Arizona, which they had settled in sometime before the arrival of the European explorers and colonists. As Spain and later Mexico attempted to gain dominion over the Chiricahua lands, the indigenous groups became increasingly resistant. Cycles of warfare developed, which the Apache mostly won. Eventually, the Spanish tried a different approach; they tried to make the Apache dependent (thereby placating them), giving them older firearms and liquor rations issued by the colonial government (this was called the "Galvez Peace Policy"). After Mexico gained independence from Spain and took control of this territory, it ended the practice, perhaps lacking the resources (and/or possibly the will) to continue it. The various Chiricahua bands resumed raiding in the 1830s to acquire what they wanted after the Mexicans stopped selling these goods to them.

As a result, the Mexican government began a series of military operations in order to stop the raiding by the Chiricahua, but they were fought to a standstill by the Apache. Cochise's father was killed in the fighting. Cochise deepened his resolve and the Chiricahua Apache pursued vengeance against the Mexicans. Mexican forces did capture Cochise at one point in 1848 during an Apache raid on Fronteras, Sonora, but they exchanged him for nearly a dozen Mexican prisoners.

Beginning with early Spanish colonization around 1600, the Apache in their territory suffered tension and strife with European settlers until the greater part of the area was acquired by the United States in 1850, following the Mexican War. For a time, the two peoples managed peaceful relations. In the late 1850s, Cochise may have supplied firewood for the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach station at Apache Pass.

The tenuous peace did not last, as European-American encroachment into Apache territory continued. In 1861 the Bascom Affair was a catalyst for armed confrontation. An Apache raiding party had driven away a local rancher's cattle and kidnapped his twelve-year-old son (Felix Ward, who later became known as Mickey Free). Cochise and his band were mistakenly accused of the incident (which had been carried out by another band, Coyotero Apache). Army officer Lt. George Bascom, invited Cochise to the Army's encampment in the belief that the warrior was responsible for the incident. Cochise maintained his innocence and offered to look into the matter with other Apache groups, but the officer tried to arrest him. Cochise escaped by drawing a knife and slashing his way out of the tent Cochise may have been shot as he fled.

Bascom captured some of Cochise's relatives, who apparently were taken by surprise as Cochise escaped. Cochise eventually also took hostages to use in negotiations to free the Apache Indians. However, the negotiations fell apart, because the arrival of U.S. troop reinforcements led Cochise to believe that the situation was spiraling out of his control. Both sides eventually killed all their remaining hostages. Cochise went on to carry out about 11 years of relentless warfare, reducing much of the Mexican/American settlements in southern Arizona to a burned-out wasteland. Dan Thrapp estimated the total death toll of settlers and Mexican/American travelers may have reached 5,000, but most historians believe it was more likely a few hundred. The mistaken arrest of Cochise by Lt. Bascom is still remembered by the Chiricahua's descendants today, who describe the incident as "Cut the Tent."

Cochise joined with his father-in-law Mangas Coloradas (Red Sleeves, Kan-da-zis Tlishishen), the powerful Chihenne-Chiricahua chief, in a long series of retaliatory skirmishes and raids on the white settlements and ranches. The Battle of Dragoon Springs was one of these engagements. During the raids, many people were killed, but the Apache quite often had the upper hand. The United States was distracted by its own internal conflict of the looming Civil War, and had begun to pull military forces out of the area. It did not have the resources to deal with the Apache. Additionally, the Apaches were highly adapted to living and fighting in the harsh terrain of the southwest. It was many years before the US Army, using tactics conceived by General Crook and later adopted by General Miles, were able to effectively challenge the Apache warrior on his own lands.

At Apache Pass in 1862, Cochise and Mangas Coloradas, with around 500 fighters, held their ground against a New Mexico-bound force of California volunteers under General James Henry Carleton until caisson-mounted howitzer artillery fire was brought to bear on their positions in the rocks above.

According to scout John C. Cremony and historian Dan L. Thrapp, the howitzer fire sent the Apaches into an immediate retreat. But Carleton's biographer, Aurora Hunt, wrote, "This was the first time that the Indians had faced artillery fire." Geronimo later recalled in his autobiography that his people were winning the fight until "you fired your wagons at us." The Battle of Apache Pass was one of the rare pitched battles the Apaches fought against the United States Army. Normally, the Apaches' tactics involved guerrilla-style warfare. Capt. Thomas Roberts was persuaded by this conflict that it would be best to find a route around Apache Pass, which he did. Gen. Carleton continued unhindered to New Mexico and subsequently took over as commander of the territory.

In January 1863, Gen. Joseph R. West, under orders from Gen. Carleton, captured Mangas Coloradas by luring him into a conference under a flag of truce. During what was to be a peaceful parley session, the Americans took Mangas Coloradas prisoner and later murdered him. This fanned the flames of enmity between the encroaching Americans and the Apache. Cochise believed that the Americans had violated the rules of war by capturing and killing Mangas Coloradas during a parley session. Cochise and the Apache continued their raids against American and Mexican settlements and military positions throughout the 1860s.

Following various skirmishes, Cochise and his men were gradually driven into the Dragoon Mountains but used the mountains for cover and as a base from which to continue attacks against the white settlements. Cochise evaded capture and continued his raids against white settlements and travelers until 1872. In 1871, General Oliver O. Howard had been ordered to find and treat with Cochise and in 1872, accompanied by 1st Lt Joseph Alton Sladen, who served as his aide, Howard came to Arizona to negotiate a peace treaty, and with the help of Tom Jeffords, who was the Apache leader's only white friend, a treaty was negotiated on October 12, 1872.

After making peace, Cochise retired to his new reservation, with his friend Jeffords as agent, where he died of natural causes (probably abdominal cancer) in 1874. He was buried in the rocks above one of his favorite camps in Arizona's Dragoon Mountains, now called Cochise Stronghold. Only his people and Tom Jeffords knew the exact location of his resting place, and they took the secret to their graves. Cochise's descendants are said to reside at the Mescalero Apache Reservation, near Ruidoso, New Mexico.*

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cochise



ETZNAB



Kin 158: White Lunar Mirror


I polarize in order to reflect
Stabilizing order
I seal the matrix of endlessness
With the lunar tone of challenge
I am guided by the power of heart.



The point of activating sacred sites is to transform the psychic energy of the human species in resonance with a cosmic template or map planted on the Earth.*



*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2015-2016.






The Sacred Tzolk'in 




Svadhistana Chakra (Kali Plasma)







Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Red Magnetic Earth/ Red Overtone Moon - Spectral Serpent Moon of Liberation, Day 24









“Indian Encampment, after Blakelock,” Fritz Scholder, ©1977, lithograph.




Fritz Scholder (October 6, 1937 – February 10, 2005) was a Native American artist. Born in Breckenridge, Minnesota, Scholder was one-quarter Luiseño, a California Mission tribe. Scholder's most influential works were post-modern in sensibility and somewhat Pop Art in execution as he sought to deconstruct the mythos of the American Indian. A teacher at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe in the late 1960s, Scholder influenced a generation of Native American students.

Scholder knew what he had to do at an early age. As a high school student at Pierre, South Dakota, his teacher was Oscar Howe, a noted Yankton Dakota artist. In the summer of 1955, Scholder attended the Mid-West Art and Music Camp at the University of Kansas. He was voted Best Boy Artist and President of the Art Camp. He studied with Robert B. Green at Lawrence. In 1956, Scholder graduated from Ashland High School in Wisconsin and took his freshman year at Wisconsin State University in Superior, where he studied with Arthur Kruk, James Grittner, and Michael Gorski. In 1957, Scholder moved with his family to Sacramento, California, where he studied with Wayne Thiebaud. Thiebaud invited Scholder to join him, along with Greg Kondos and Peter Vandenberg in creating a cooperative gallery in Sacramento. Scholder’s first show received an exceptional review. Scholder’s next one-man exhibition was at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento. His work was being shown throughout the region, including the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. Upon graduation from Sacramento State University, where he studied with Tarmo Pasto and Raymond Witt, Scholder was invited to participate in the Rockefeller Indian Art Project at the University of Arizona in 1961. He met Cherokee designer Lloyd Kiva New and studied with Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma. After receiving a John Hay Whitney Fellowship, Scholder moved to Tucson and became a graduate assistant in the Fine Arts Department where he studied with Andrew Rush and Charles Littler. There, he met artists Max Cole, John Heric and Bruce McGrew. After graduating with an MFA Degree in 1964, Scholder accepted the position of instructor in Advanced Painting and Contemporary Art History at the newly formed Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Scholder has always worked in series of paintings. In 1967, his new series on the Native American, depicting the “real Indian,” became an immediate controversy. Scholder painted Indians with American flags, beer cans, and cats. His target was the loaded national cliché and guilt of the dominant culture. Scholder did not grow up as an Indian and his unique perspective could not be denied. Scholder resigned from IAIA in 1969 and traveled to Europe and North Africa. He returned to Santa Fe and acquired a small adobe house and studio on Canyon Road.

In 1970, Tamarind Institute moved from Los Angeles to Albuquerque. Scholder was invited by Tamarind to do the first major project, a suite of lithographs, Indians Forever. It was the beginning of a large body of work in that medium for the artist. Scholder/Indians was published by Northland Press, the first book on Scholder’s work. In the same year, Scholder had his first one-man show at the Lee Nordness Galleries.

He had become a major influence for a generation of Native American artists. He was invited to lecture at numerous art conferences and universities including Princeton and Dartmouth. In 1972 an exhibition of the Dartmouth Portraits opened at Cordier and Ekstrom in New York to favorable reviews. In the same year, Adelyn D. Breeskin of the Smithsonian American Art Museum visited Scholder and suggested a two-person show of the work of Scholder and one of his former students. Scholder chose T. C. Cannon. The show opened in Washington, D.C. to good reviews and traveled to Romania, Yugoslavia, Berlin, and London. Scholder was invited to have a one-man show at the Basil V International Art Fair in Switzerland in 1974. After Basel, Scholder traveled to Egypt and painted the sphinx and pyramids.

In 1975, Scholder did his first etchings at El Dorado Press in Berkeley, California. Scholder's work was explored in a series on American Indian artists for the Public Broadcasting System (PBS). Other artists in the series included R. C. Gorman, Helen Hardin, Allan Houser, Charles Loloma, and Joseph Lonewolf. Also in 1975, a book of his lithographs was released by New York Graphic Society. Scholder discovered monotypes in 1977. His first exhibition of photographs was shown at the Heard Museum in 1978, documented by Indian Kitsch, a book published by Northland Press. A miniature book of Scholder’s poetry was produced by Stinehour Press in 1979. In 1980, Scholder was guest artist at the Oklahoma Art Institute, which resulted in a PBS film documentary, American Portrait. His second retrospective opened at the new Tucson Museum of Art in 1981. Scholder drew lithographs at Ediciones Poligrafa in Barcelona and was guest artist at ISOMATA, USC at Idyllwild, California and again at the Oklahoma Arts Institute.

In 1982, Scholder acquired a loft in Manhattan. A major monograph was published by Rizzoli International, and Scholder returned to Egypt at the invitation of famed archeologist Kent Weeks. In 1983, Scholder received a New Mexico Governor's Award for Excellence in the Arts.[3] Scholder was named lifetime Societaire of the Salon d'Automne and exhibited at the Grand Palais in Paris in 1984. The following year, he was honored with the Golden Plate Award from the American Academy of Achievement. In 1991, Afternoon Nap was published, the first in a series of book projects by Nazraeli Press in Munich. Scholder received five honorary degrees from Ripon College, the University of Arizona, Concordia College, the College of Santa Fe and the first honorary degree from the University of Wisconsin–Superior. A humanitarian award from the 14th Norsk Hostfest followed.

Unlike many artists, Scholder was keenly aware of the impact of recognition he received; this was especially true with respect to his inclusions in books and magazines. Rightfully, he pointed out that once his contributions were named and illustrated in hard copy---later to be treated as reference materials--- his place in art history would be relatively secure. His selection of appropriate galleries was likewise conscious, although throughout his career, he remained loyal to one of the first galleries to believe in his work, the Tally Richards Gallery in Taos, New Mexico. For several years, Tally's gallery routinely sold out its annual offerings of Scholder's work, helping to keep this gallery afloat for the remaining 11 months.

On August 25, 2009, Governor Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver announced that Scholder would be one of 13 California Hall of Fame inductees for that award. His work was then featured at The California Museum's exhibit of the work and contributions of that year's Hall of Fame laureates. The induction ceremony was on December 1, 2009 at the Museum in Sacramento. Scholder's Future Clone sculpture was included in a scene in Darren Aronofsky's 2010 film Black Swan, in which it has been described as "chilling like a Baselitz painting, all devoured face and wings, an evil spectre".*

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritz_Scholder



CABAN



Kin 157: Red Magnetic Earth


I unify in order to evolve
Attracting synchronicity
I seal the matrix of navigation
With the magnetic tone of purpose
I am guided by my own power doubled.



Cosmic Science provides a key tool for understanding and activating multidimensional para-normality.*



*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2015-2016.






The Sacred Tzolk'in 





Ajna Chakra (Gamma Plasma)