CURRENT MOON

Friday, March 31, 2017

Blue Crystal Hand/ Blue Electric Storm - Solar Jaguar Moon of Intention, Day 25





The Biddle House was built in 1780 and is one of the oldest buildings on Mackinac Island. It will undergo a renovation project to more fully tell the Native American perspective of the history of the Island.
The Biddle House was built in 1780 and is one of the oldest buildings on Mackinac Island.
 It will undergo a renovation project to more fully tell the Native American perspective of the history of the Island.





Mackinac Island Finally Telling Native Side of History:

Agatha Biddle’s home will be restored to tell Native history of Mackinac Island




Agatha Biddle is not exactly a name that rolls off the tongues of historians or history teachers. But Eric Hemenway is working hard to change that. The director of archives and records for the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians in Harbor Springs, Michigan, is teaming up with Mackinac State Historic Parks to retell the story of Mackinac Island from a Native perspective—Biddle’s.

“Agatha is a very interesting character in our island’s history. Like many people in the region at the time, she was of mixed heritage—part French, Odawa and Ojibwe, but she identified as Odawa, and had this massive kinship network all through the Great Lakes,” Hemenway said.

In the first half of the 1800s, Mackinac Island residents were mostly Native American, a fact often overlooked in the island’s history. “When Agatha was a child, Michigan was almost exclusively Native American. By the time she was an elderly woman in the late 1800s, Natives were the vast minority and had lost most of their land. Agatha saw firsthand the complete transformation of Anishinaabe life and culture,” Hemenway said.

Born Agatha de la Vigne in the early 1800s on Mackinac Island, she rose to prominence after her marriage to Edward Biddle, who hailed from a wealthy Philadelphia family. The couple ran a small, but well-respected independent fur-trading business in town when beaver pelts were all the rage. “She controlled the family business. She set the prices, negotiated with fur traders and hosted functions at her home,” Hemenway said.

In fact, the Biddle House still stands and is the oldest home on Mackinac Island. It is believed to date back to 1780, according to the Mackinac State Historic Parks website. A lot happened under that roof. Not only did it serve as an economic hub for fur trading and a gathering place for Agatha’s Native kin, but she and Edward also raised three children there, and sheltered and fed many others. Hemenway said Agatha was always taking in orphans and needy children. “She was like an impromptu foster parent, and also helped families and the elderly who were down and out. She treated people well, and in return, they did business with her.”

By all accounts, Agatha was a modern-day woman, far ahead of her time. She was a wife, mother, successful businesswoman, a leader in the church and community, and a chief to the band of Mackinac Indians. “She had a lot of facets to her character, all rolled into one persona,” said Hemenway, an Anishinaabe quite familiar with strong, Native American women. “We have a long history of women leaders in our tribe. My mother, Peggy Hemenway, was actively involved in the fight by the Little Traverse Bay Bands Odawa tribe for treaty and civil rights in the ’80s.”

Most important, Agatha was an eyewitness to history. Mackinac Island was the site of two battles during the War of 1812. “They happened right in her backyard,” said Hemenway, who added that her loyalties were likely torn. “Because of her business interests, she remained neutral. However, the Odawa and Ojibwe were adamantly against the Americans and allied with the British.”

According to Hemenway, Agatha also witnessed the signing of the Treaty of Washington in 1836. Through this treaty, the Odawa and Chippewa of Northern Michigan ceded about 16 million acres to the U.S. government. In return, the government allowed these tribes to stay in Michigan on small reservations and access natural resources.

“The treaty was brought back to Mackinac Island for all the tribal representatives to sign. More than 4,000 Anishinaabe gathered for the signing and Agatha was right there in the thick of it,” Hemenway said.

Frank Straus, a writer for the Mackinac Island Town Crier, credits Agatha’s well-developed kinship network with the Odawa, Pottawatomi and Anishinaabe nations for saving many tribal members from forced removal from their lands as mandated in the Indian Removal Act of 1830. He said Agatha used her senior standing in this network to develop ties between Native American hunters and the “capitalist system.” He wrote: “This may have helped ensure that the Odawa and Anishinaabe were not forced to move westward in the 1830s/40s … Many of her kinfolk were too valuable as participants in the Michigan Territory economy to be subjected to brutal ethnic cleansing.”

To bring this rich, Native story of Mackinac Island to life, Hemenway and Mackinac State Historic Parks are overseeing a $300,000 makeover of the Biddle House, scheduled for completion in 2019—more than 50 years after its original restoration in 1962. Renovation highlights will include a two-room exhibit on the Native American history of the island. The Biddle House is currently open to the public, but soon, visitors will learn all about its hero, Agatha Biddle, whose name might not be recognizable now, but Hemenway hopes that one day it will be.

“I can’t think of a better female leader or historic figure for the Odawa tribe,” he said.*

By Lynn Armitage

*https://indiancountrymedianetwork.com/history/traditional-societies/mackinac-island-finally-telling-native-side-history/?mqsc=ED3879255



MANIK



Kin 207: Blue Crystal Hand


I dedicate in order to know
Universalizing healing 
I seal the store of accomplishment
With the crystal tone of cooperation
I am guided by the power of self-generation.


To master the energy system, sensitivity should be developed in the psycho-sensory system so you are able to perceive both that which is apparent and that which is not apparent.*


*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2016-2017.





The Sacred Tzolk'in 




Svadhistana Chakra (Kali Plasma)




Thursday, March 30, 2017

White Spectral World-Bridger/ White Lunar Mirror - Solar Jaguar Moon of Intention, Day 17





Left to right - Jennifer Bobiwash as Carol, Chris Jorie as Professor Houck, Jason Grasl as Randy - Courtesy 2017 Craig Schwartz Photography
Left to right - Jennifer Bobiwash as Carol, Chris Jorie as Professor Houck, Jason Grasl as Randy - 
  Courtesy 2017 Craig Schwartz Photography




Native Voices Theater Company in Gripping Play: ‘Fairly Traceable’:

Mary Kathryn Nagle’s ‘Fairly Traceable’ touches on Love, Hurricanes and Tribal Justice

Mary Kathryn Nagle is ambitious, brilliant and talented. She proves it once again in her new play showcased by the Native Voices Theater Company in Los Angeles. Fairly Traceable, which opened March 10. It addresses the devastation of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita and the relationship crisis experienced by two Native law students.  

Native Voices at the Autry is the leading Native American theater company in the U.S. focusing on Native narratives, and is the only Equity theater company dedicated exclusively to developing stage productions by Native American, Alaska Native and First Nations playwrights.

Formed in 1993, Native Voices has helped launch the careers of over a dozen Native playwrights, such as Larissa Fast Horse (Sicangu Lakota), Drew Hayden Taylor (Curve Lake First Nations), and Randy Reinholz (Choctaw), Native Voices co-founder and Producing Artistic Director.

In Fairly Traceable, Mary Kathryn Nagle, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, brings together her personal worlds of law, tribal sovereignty, environmental justice and identity. All of her plays — which to date count 11 — reflect similar themes, drawn from her career as a lawyer as well as her experience as a descendant of the famous Cherokee leaders Major Ridge and his son John Ridge.

Fairly Traceable is told through the lives of two young American Indians, both law students at Tulane University in New Orleans. After meeting in one of their law classes, Randy and Erin, the only Natives in their program, become romantically involved just before tragedy strikes with Hurricane Katrina, and then Hurricane Rita a month later. Randy is Ponca from Oklahoma and Erin is Chitimacha, then a federally unrecognized tribe in the bayou of southern Louisiana. When Rita devastates the Chitimacha community of Pointe-au-Chien it sets into motion a relationship crisis that will have lingering effects for years to come.  

But it’s not the fallout from the hurricane itself that causes the discord between Randy and Erin. The trouble is rooted in the couple’s differences as Native people with very different historical experiences and family circumstances.

The tensions begin when Erin joins their law professor in a legal clinic to bring a lawsuit against oil companies for dumping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Newly armed with the affirmation that greenhouse gases can be fairly traceable to the oil industry, they can potentially prove the oil companies are responsible for the new level of hurricane destructiveness that destroyed Erin’s home community.

Randy, meanwhile, surreptitiously decides to take a job at one of the oil companies his colleagues are suing. This conflict lays the groundwork for the redemption and resolution that must be worked out throughout the rest of the play.

One of the most powerful moments in the production comes with a creative use of technology, where the names of victims of both hurricanes are projected and read aloud, driving home the very real human cost of climate change.

Much of Fairly Traceable’s content is semi-autobiographical. Nagle was in law school at Tulane when the hurricanes hit, and when the Massachusetts decision was handed down. She even uses the name of the law professor, Professor Houck, who is a prominently featured character in the play.

In a post-production discussion with W. Richard West, Jr, Autry’s CEO, Nagle said that the first play she ever wrote — while she was in law school — was a way for her to process the trauma of the hurricane. As a student of environmental law, she said she was also inspired by the Kivalina case, which relied on the fairly traceable concept to sue Exxon for the loss of a Native village in Alaska due to flooding from rising sea levels. That case was lost in lower courts based on the argument that regulating greenhouse emissions was a political rather than legal issue that should be solved congressionally and administratively, not in courts, and the Supreme Court declined to hear it.

Fairly Traceable ran at the Autry through March 26 and was directed by Jon Lawrence Rivera. The lead actors are Kyla Garcia (Taino), Jason Grasl (Blackfeet), Jennifer Bobiwash (Ojibway), Kinsale Hurston (Navajo), and Chris Jorie as Professor Houck.* 

By Dina Gilio-Whitaker




CIMI



Kin 206: White Spectral World-Bridger


I dissolve in order to equalize
Releasing opportunity
I seal the store of death
With the spectral tone of liberation
I am guided by my own power doubled.


Displacement is how you move from one point to another point in the universe by means of resonant transduction of the etheric body along specific electrical lines of force.*


*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2016-2017.











 The Sacred Tzolk'in



Ajna Chakra (Gamma Plasma)




Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Red Planetary Serpent/ Red Magnetic Earth - Solar Jaguar Moon of Intention, Day 16






Tony Enos at Oceti Sakowin in front of the Two-Spirit Nation camp. Photo courtesy of Tony Enos
Tony Enos at Oceti Sakowin in front of the Two-Spirit Nation camp.
Courtesy Tony Enos



8 Things You Should Know About Two Spirit People:

Two Spirit has been present for countless generations that predate LGBTQ terminology

When attempting to explain the concept of Two Spirit people in Indian country, many people may visualize images of Unicorns and Rainbows, Donna Summers and Seventies disco balls. Try to explain the concept of Two Spirit outside Indian country, and you may as well throw in war bonnets and glitter.

The term Two Spirit has been present in Native communities for countless generations that predate LGBTQ terminology. For generations, Two Spirit Native culture went underground to avoid detection and persecution.

Today the Two Spirit movement has been negatively affected by rumor, gossip, the tyranny of western religion, and an all-around lack of information.

Here are eight misconceptions and/or things you should know about Two Spirit people that may help foster a better understanding of the Two Spirit community.

Two Spirit is not a contemporary “new-age” movement.

While the term Two Spirit was coined in 1990 In Winnipeg, Canada as a means of unifying various gender identities and expressions of Native American/First Nations/Indigenous individuals, the term is not a specific definition of gender, sexual orientation or other self-determining catch-all phrase, but rather an umbrella term.

Two Spirit people have both a male and female spirit within them and are blessed by their Creator to see life through the eyes of both genders.

The term does not diminish the tribal-specific names, roles and traditions nations have for their own Two Spirit people. Examples of such names are the winkte among the Lakota and the nadleeh among the Navajo people.

These names and roles go back to a time before western religion. Two Spirit is not a “New Age” movement, but rather a reclamation of Two Spirit’s rightful place in Native culture.

We have proof of Two Spirit individuals in historical photos.   A quick google search will render black and whites from decades ago with Two Spirit tribal members from various nations, such as We’wha, a very well-known and documented Two Spirit of the Zuni people, who crossed over in 1896.

Being a gay native is oftentimes confused with being Two Spirit. While the two may have parallels and intersections, they are not the same. Gay specifically is about attraction to a person of the same sex. Two Spirit is more about the embodiment of two genders residing within one person.

A Two Spirit person may be gay, but a gay person is not necessarily Two Spirit. Claiming the role of Two Spirit is to take up the spiritual responsibility that the role traditionally had. Walking the red road, being for the people and our children/youth, and being a guiding force in a good way with a good mind are just some of those responsibilities.

The Two Spirit Road is a road of long held traditions, prayer and responsibility 

Living as a Two Spirit is not all pride parades and hot pants. To be of service to our elders and youth with our very particular medicine is paramount. If we lose our traditions, our songs, our medicines, and our languages, and make no effort to restore what was lost, we doom ourselves.

In 2016 Two Spirit nation at Oceti Sakowin built the Cannonball River prayer pier, to be used for water ceremonies. Knee deep in mud on a cold 2016 November morning, the Two Spirit camp worked till sundown, so that our women and elders could have a place to pray the following morning. Actual events such a this are now part of our modern history as Two Spirit people and should never be minimized. As with all of Native culture, Two Spirit is also a living culture. 

Two Spirit people held significant roles and were an integral part of a tribal social structures

Two Spirit people held a meaningful place in the sacred hoop.  In many tribes Two Spirits were balance keepers. Thought to be the “dusk” between the male morning, and the female evening. As the role has evolved over time as necessary, the tradition is still alive. At Two Spirit gatherings and communal events, we can be found saying prayers that have needed to be said for decades, and fostering healing to all present. Restoring much needed balance to spirit.

Two Spirit Does Not Indicate Colonized Boxed Definitions of “L”, “G”, “B”, “T” or “Q”

We can be all of these, or none of these. A western mindset categorizes based on standards of ‘norm’ and ‘other’ in a kyriarchal (to rule or dominate) type structure. This mindset imposes a series of boxes to fit into (you’re either gay, you’re a lesbian, etc.) rather than being comfortable with gender fluidity, Two Spirit acknowledges the continuum of gender identity and expression. 

Two Spirit is a term only appropriate for Native people.

Two Spirit is a role that existed in a Native American/First Nations/Indigenous tribe for gender queer, gender fluid, and gender non-conforming tribal members. If you don’t have a tribe, you can’t claim that role. 

Two Spirit People face compounded trauma’s on top of inter-generational trauma.

Imagine going from your nation where you’re a celebrated Two Spirit individual, to a boarding school where you’re assigned your gender, with any push back about it being beat out of you. For a lot of our boarding school survivors (and those who didn’t survive), this was their reality. As a result, there is still healing from much internalized socio-political stigma, phobia, and lateral oppression to be done in the Two Spirit community.

The resilience, strength, and sheer indomitable will of Two Spirit people is something to be shared with all nations. When you watch the sun rise every day, the sun set every evening, and the moon come out each night, remember the miracle of Two Spirit people. Not unnatural, not evil, or perverse, just all things in balance, and everything in divine order.*

By Tony Enos 




CHICCHAN



Kin 205: Red Planetary Serpent


I perfect in order to survive
Producing instinct
I seal the store of life force
With the planetary tone of manifestation
I am guided by the power of space
I am a polar kin
I extend the red galactic spectrum.


Do not flinch from looking into the face of suffering and hunger. Give what you can without hesitation.*


*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2016-2017.







The Sacred Tzolkin






Muladhara Chakra (Seli Plasma)





Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Yellow Solar Seed/ Yellow Cosmic Warrior -Solar Jaguar Moon of Intention, Day 15





Pipelines like the Dakota Access Pipeline are not only a danger to the environment, but they trample indigenous rights.
Pipelines like the Dakota Access Pipeline are not only a danger to the environment, but they trample indigenous rights.
Courtesy Democracy Now




Fracking, Pipelines and Coal Projects Trample Indigenous Rights:
Indigenous rights and environment affected when pipelines constructed

Indian communities were dismayed when President Donald Trump signed executive orders restarting construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Keystone XL pipeline. Indian communities and environmentalists opposed both projects pointing out that sacred lands were jeopardized, as well as drinking water, treaty and indigenous rights.

The administration says it will renegotiate parts of the pipeline projects to conform better to Indian interests. However, one usually negotiates before making the key decision like moving a project forward. The two pipelines are similar to many projects that Indigenous Peoples want to have a voice in and even the power to prevent since they threaten sacred sites and jeopardize healthy communities.

Indigenous Peoples are confronted often with losses of land, in part because Indian lands are often relatively powerless to successfully oppose building of dams, pipelines, oil drilling and other projects. The administration argues that thousands of good construction jobs will be created, but that is not necessarily true. American oil will find good prices while OPEC and oil producing nations moderately decrease production to increase and stabilize higher oil prices. Both pipelines are designed to bring Alberta and Montana-North Dakota oil, produced from fracking and sand production, more efficiently to market. The encouragement of dubious resource extraction methods as well as increased oil consumption by themselves may create long-term environmental damage.

Indigenous Peoples confront resource extraction markets around the world. The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples addresses the issue of prior and informed consent. Often Indigenous Peoples are asked for their input, but most often, indigenous views do not prevail. Indigenous Peoples are not apposed to development per se, but want to see their children and communities benefit from development. They often do not want to see development if it destroys the local environment, and does little to improve the lives of indigenous communities.

Efforts by Indigenous Peoples to stop develop projects harmful to their land, people or cultures, often have rarely succeeded. Some projects that have succeeded are the Northern Cheyenne who fought for the right to clean air when developers were mining and burning coal near their reservation. Another was when Isleta Pueblo won a case against the City of Albuquerque to keep down river water clean enough for human use and pure enough for sacred ceremonial activities. In both cases, one reason the Indian nations won long and expensive court battles was because they had the support of the Environmental Protection Agency. Most likely, tribes involved in the two pipeline controversies now will not secure EPA support for preserving sustainable environmental conditions. The present administration most likely will appoint leaders who prefer the increased development and marketing of low grade oil, rather than support indigenous rights and long term environmental concerns.

Cheap oil is like a drug. There is a market for oil as long as large numbers of people are willing to purchase gas and continue to drive gas-guzzling vehicles. While standing up for environmental and indigenous rights is important, such efforts should be combined with personally engaging the market by not buying or investing in oil products and gas using vehicles. The time is getting closer where electric cars and solar energy may compete with cheap gas and automobiles.

A lifestyle and community built around use and production of solar and other renewable energies may be needed for future planetary and human well-being. Indigenous Peoples want a better economic standard of life, one of the Trump administration’s promises, but indigenous people do not want to sacrifice the land and environment to achieve quick economic gain. A world with markets built around renewable energy and resources, may be the best solution in the long run. Such choices are compatible with indigenous views of respecting the environment and living in ways that enable sustainable environments well into the foreseeable future. Protest and choose consistently with your market place decisions.*

By Duane Champagne 

*https://indiancountrymedianetwork.com/news/indigenous-peoples/fracking-pipelines-coal-projects-trample-indigenous-rights/




KAN



Kin 204: Yellow Solar Seed


I pulse in order to target
Realizing awareness
I seal the input of flowering
With the solar tone of intention
I am guided by the power of universal fire.



Remember that life is wearing off and a smaller part of it is left daily.*



*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2016-2017.










 The Sacred Tzolk'in





Sahasrara Chakra  (Dali Plasma)




Monday, March 27, 2017

Blue Galactic Night/ Blue Crystal Eagle - Solar Jaguar Moon of Intention, Day 14






Brown Memorial Tower at Union Theological Seminary.



'Religious left' emerging as U.S. political force in Trump era.



Since President Donald Trump's election, monthly lectures on social justice at the 600-seat Gothic chapel of New York's Union Theological Seminary have been filled to capacity with crowds three times what they usually draw.

In January, the 181-year-old Upper Manhattan graduate school, whose architecture evokes London's Westminster Abbey, turned away about 1,000 people from a lecture on mass incarceration. In the nine years that Reverend Serene Jones has served as its president, she has never seen such crowds.

"The election of Trump has been a clarion call to progressives in the Protestant and Catholic churches in America to move out of a place of primarily professing progressive policies to really taking action," she said.

Although not as powerful as the religious right, which has been credited with helping elect Republican presidents and boasts well-known leaders such as Christian Broadcasting Network founder Pat Robertson, the "religious left" is now slowly coming together as a force in U.S. politics.

This disparate group, traditionally seen as lacking clout, has been propelled into political activism by Trump's policies on immigration, healthcare and social welfare, according to clergy members, activists and academics. A key test will be how well it will be able to translate its mobilization into votes in the 2018 midterm congressional elections.

"It's one of the dirty little secrets of American politics that there has been a religious left all along and it just hasn't done a good job of organizing," said J. Patrick Hornbeck II, chairman of the theology department at Fordham University, a Jesuit school in New York.

"It has taken a crisis, or perceived crisis, like Trump's election to cause folks on the religious left to really own their religion in the public square," Hornbeck said.

Religious progressive activism has been part of American history. Religious leaders and their followers played key roles in campaigns to abolish slavery, promote civil rights and end the Vietnam War, among others. The latest upsurge of left-leaning religious activism has accompanied the dawn of the Trump presidency.

Some in the religious left are inspired by Pope Francis, the Roman Catholic leader who has been an outspoken critic of anti-immigrant policies and a champion of helping the needy.

Although support for the religious left is difficult to measure, leaders point to several examples, such as a surge of congregations offering to provide sanctuary to immigrants seeking asylum, churches urging Republicans to reconsider repealing the Obamacare health law and calls to preserve federal spending on foreign aid.

The number of churches volunteering to offer sanctuary to asylum seekers doubled to 800 in 45 of the 50 U.S. states after the election, said the Elkhart, Indiana-based Church World Service, a coalition of Christian denominations which helps refugees settle in the United States - and the number of new churches offering help has grown so quickly that the group has lost count.

"The religious community, the religious left is getting out, hitting the streets, taking action, raising their voices," said Reverend Noel Anderson, its national grassroots coordinator.

In one well-publicized case, a Quaker church in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on March 14 took in a Honduran woman who has been living illegally in the United States for 25 years and feared she would be targeted for deportation.

 By Scott Malone
Since President Donald Trump's election, monthly lectures on social justice at the 600-seat Gothic chapel of New York's Union Theological Seminary have been filled to capacity with crowds three times what they usually draw.

In January, the 181-year-old Upper Manhattan graduate school, whose architecture evokes London's Westminster Abbey, turned away about 1,000 people from a lecture on mass incarceration. In the nine years that Reverend Serene Jones has served as its president, she has never seen such crowds.

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"The election of Trump has been a clarion call to progressives in the Protestant and Catholic churches in America to move out of a place of primarily professing progressive policies to really taking action," she said.

Although not as powerful as the religious right, which has been credited with helping elect Republican presidents and boasts well-known leaders such as Christian Broadcasting Network founder Pat Robertson, the "religious left" is now slowly coming together as a force in U.S. politics.

This disparate group, traditionally seen as lacking clout, has been propelled into political activism by Trump's policies on immigration, healthcare and social welfare, according to clergy members, activists and academics. A key test will be how well it will be able to translate its mobilization into votes in the 2018 midterm congressional elections.

"It's one of the dirty little secrets of American politics that there has been a religious left all along and it just hasn't done a good job of organizing," said J. Patrick Hornbeck II, chairman of the theology department at Fordham University, a Jesuit school in New York.

"It has taken a crisis, or perceived crisis, like Trump's election to cause folks on the religious left to really own their religion in the public square," Hornbeck said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Religious progressive activism has been part of American history. Religious leaders and their followers played key roles in campaigns to abolish slavery, promote civil rights and end the Vietnam War, among others. The latest upsurge of left-leaning religious activism has accompanied the dawn of the Trump presidency.

Some in the religious left are inspired by Pope Francis, the Roman Catholic leader who has been an outspoken critic of anti-immigrant policies and a champion of helping the needy.

Although support for the religious left is difficult to measure, leaders point to several examples, such as a surge of congregations offering to provide sanctuary to immigrants seeking asylum, churches urging Republicans to reconsider repealing the Obamacare health law and calls to preserve federal spending on foreign aid.

The number of churches volunteering to offer sanctuary to asylum seekers doubled to 800 in 45 of the 50 U.S. states after the election, said the Elkhart, Indiana-based Church World Service, a coalition of Christian denominations which helps refugees settle in the United States - and the number of new churches offering help has grown so quickly that the group has lost count.

"The religious community, the religious left is getting out, hitting the streets, taking action, raising their voices," said Reverend Noel Anderson, its national grassroots coordinator.

In one well-publicized case, a Quaker church in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on March 14 took in a Honduran woman who has been living illegally in the United States for 25 years and feared she would be targeted for deportation. 

'NEVER SEEN' THIS

Leaders of Faith in Public Life, a progressive policy group, were astounded when 300 clergy members turned out at a January rally at the U.S. Senate attempting to block confirmation of Trump's attorney general nominee, Jeff Sessions, because of his history of controversial statements on race.

"I've never seen hundreds of clergy turning up like that to oppose a Cabinet nominee," said Reverend Jennifer Butler, the group's chief executive.

The group on Wednesday convened a Capitol Hill rally of hundreds of pastors from as far away as Ohio, North Carolina and Texas to urge Congress to ensure that no people lose their health insurance as a result of a vote to repeal Obamacare.

Financial support is also picking up. Donations to the Christian activist group Sojourners have picked up by 30 percent since Trump's election, the group said.

But some observers were skeptical that the religious left could equal the religious right politically any time soon.

"It really took decades of activism for the religious right to become the force that it is today," said Peter Ubertaccio, chairman of the political science department at Stonehill College, a Catholic school outside Boston.

But the power potential of the "religious left" is not negligible. The "Moral Mondays" movement, launched in 2013 by the North Carolina NAACP's Reverend William Barber, is credited with contributing to last year's election defeat of Republican Governor Pat McCrory by Democrat Roy Cooper.

The new political climate is also spurring new alliances, with churches, synagogues and mosques speaking out against the recent spike in bias incidents, including threats against mosques and Jewish community centers.

The Sisterhood of Salaam Shalom, which encourages alliances between Jewish and Muslim women, has tripled its number of U.S. chapters to nearly 170 since November, said founder Sheryl Olitzky.

"This is not about partisanship, but about vulnerable populations who need protection, whether it's the LGBT community, the refugee community, the undocumented community," said Rabbi Jonah Pesner, director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, using the acronym for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender.

More than 1,000 people have already signed up for the center's annual Washington meeting on political activism, about three times as many as normal, Pesner said.

Leaders of the religious right who supported Trump say they see him delivering on his promises and welcomed plans to defund Planned Parenthood, whose healthcare services for women include abortion, through the proposed repeal of Obamacare.

"We have not seen any policy proposals that run counter to our faith," said Lance Lemmonds, a spokesman for the Faith & Freedom Coalition, a nonprofit group based in Duluth, Georgia.*

(Reporting by Scott Malone in Boston; Additional reporting by Laila Kearney in New York; Editing by Dina Kyriakidou Jonathan Oatis)

*http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN16Y114?utm_source=applenews




AKBAL



Kin 203: Blue Galactic Night

I harmonize in order to dream
Modeling intuition
I seal the input of abundance
With the galactic tone of integrity
I am guided by the power of accomplishment
I am a galactic activation portal
Enter me.


The Sirian persona is a telepathic channel open to the frequency lines of all beings.*


*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2016-2017.









The Sacred Tzolk'in 






Anahata Chakra (Silio Plasma)





Sunday, March 26, 2017

White Resonant Wind/ White Spectral Wizard - Solar Jaguar Moon of Intention, Day 13






Keystone XL pipeline segments.
Keystone XL pipeline segments. 
Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press




Keystone XL Foes Brace for Battle:

President Donald Trump approves permit for Keystone XL Pipeline across Canadian border re-igniting opposition

President Donald Trump’s approval of the cross-border permit that would allow the Keystone XL pipeline to be laid across the 49th Parallel eliminates the hurdle that stopped it in 2015. But other obstacles have cropped up in the meantime, and opponents of the TransCanada project in both the U.S. and Canada are joining forces to fight the pipeline—led by Indigenous Peoples.

“Today, the fight to kill the Keystone XL Pipeline begins anew—and Donald Trump should expect far greater resistance than ever before,” said Tom Goldtooth, executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network. “Indigenous people are rising up and fighting like our lives, sovereignty, and climate depend on it—because they do. Over and over again, we’ve seen Trump choose the profits of his billionaire friends over our sovereign, treaty and human rights. It shows a clear disregard of our tribal rights to consent and self-determination, and it is unacceptable in this day and age.”

Trump had signed executive orders and memoranda days after taking office that were designed to move forward both the Keystone XL and Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Soon afterward the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave Energy Transfer Partners the last permit it needed to drill under the Missouri River at Lake Oahe. And on Friday March 24, U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Tom Shannon signed a permit for TransCanada “to construct, connect, operate, and maintain pipeline facilities at the U.S.-Canadian border in Phillips County, Montana for the importation of crude oil,” according to a State Department press release. (Newly appointed Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, the former CEO of Exxon Mobil, had recused himself from the decision, according to McClatchy newswire.)

“Today we begin to make things right,” Trump said on Friday March 24, according to The New York Times.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe said the approval would do anything but. Chairman David Archambault II decried the Keystone XL approval and vowed that the tribe would fight it as vociferously as it had stood ground against DAPL.

“Once again, the treaty lands of the Great Sioux Nation are threatened by Keystone—a perilous pipeline,” Archambault said in a statement. “President Trump has described the proposed pipeline as ‘the greatest technology known to man or woman.’ If that is the case, then I would encourage him to do some research and look at the number of oil spills we’ve experienced throughout this country, the levels of water pollution, and the science behind climate change. This is not the way of the future.”

The $8 billion pipeline is slated to transport up to 830,000 barrels per day of viscous bitumen from the Alberta Oil Sands in Canada, to the U.S. and eventually to the Gulf Coast for likely export. Given the need to reduce fossil fuel extraction and consumption, Obama in 2015 declared it was not in the best interests of the United States.

The project has been hit with resistance in both the U.S. and Canada.

“Governments should be supporting action to fight climate change and support Indigenous rights, not trying to ram through projects like the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline,” said Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Manitoba Regional Chief Kevin Hart in a statement from the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion, a consortium of 122 First Nations and tribes on both sides of the border. “Indigenous peoples across the continent will stand together to protect our rights and our traditional territories.”

The indigenous groups oppose expansion of the Alberta oil sands in general and has been working to block passage of various pipeline and rail projects to transport crude from that region.

Trump’s actions do not ensure that the pipeline will be built. It lacks permits in key areas, and some of its existing permits have expired elsewhere, meaning the company will have to reapply. And opponents such as Bold Nebraska, where the route remains unapproved, plan to step up their game.

“TransCanada still has no state permit or approved route in Nebraska,” Bold Nebraska said in a statement. “The Nebraska Public Service Commission just launched an 8-12 month review of their pipeline route permit application. The process includes public hearings and formal ‘intervenor’ proceedings that will take legal, Treaty and water experts.”

Also standing between TransCanada and approval “is the core group of brave farmers and ranchers, who for seven years have refused to give in to TransCanada’s threats of using eminent domain for their private gain,” Bold Nebraska said. “Landowners have fought the TransCanada’s attempts to seize their land against their will and continue to fight this abuse of eminent domain for private gain in the courts.”

With exemptions to Trump’s stated requirement that Keystone XL be made with U.S. instead of foreign steel, plus the minimal number of jobs that would be created, are not engendering much faith in the project’s necessity.

“The Trump Administration’s review of this toxic pipeline was tainted from the beginning, leaving no doubt that Trump would try to force this pipeline through regardless of the consequences it would have on the communities it touches, or on our climate,” Goldtooth said. “We’ve stopped the toxic Keystone XL Pipeline once, and we will do it again. Indigenous nations stand united not just here in the U.S. but around the world. This fight is not over, it is just beginning.”*





IK



Kin 202: White Resonant Wind


I channel in order to communicate
Inspiring breath
I seal the input of spirit
With the resonant tone of attunement
I am guided by the power of timelessness.



The seven volumes of the Cosmic History Chronicles  are derived from a memory stream that not only traces back hundreds of thousands of Earth years, but also extends into other galaxies.*


*Star Traveler's 13 Moon Almanac of Synchronicity, Galactic Research Institute, Law of Time Press, Ashland, Oregon, 2016-2017,







The Sacred Tzolk'in





Manipura Chakra (Limi Plasma)